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New and Improved treatments

Targeting class IIa histone deacetylases to impair breast cancer cell metabolism and survival

Deakin University Dr

Sean McGee

Advances in breast cancer treatment have improved patient outcomes dramatically, however breast cancer is still responsible for an unacceptable number of deaths. A significant number of patients do not respond to standard treatments, or become resistant to these treatments over time. New approaches are needed to reduce mortality due to breast cancer.

Cancer cells, including breast cancer cells, require alterations in metabolism to support their rapid growth and survival. Findings ways to alter cancer metabolism is a strategy to not only slow cancer progression, but also sensitise cancer to existing treatments. We have evidence that a family of enzymes that alter DNA structure and turn on cancer metabolism genes are involved in breast cancer. This project will examine the role of these enzymes in breast cancer metabolism, survival and sensitivity to existing chemotherapy treatments. In addition, this project will determine whether inhibiting these enzymes enhances responses to existing treatments, as well as whether these enzymes predict patient survival and treatment outcomes.

This research proposal will increase our understanding of how breast cancer cells alter their metabolism to help them survive and could identify a new treatment strategy that would sensitise breast cancer to existing breast cancer treatments.

Deakin University Dr

Sean McGee