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BREAST CANCER IN YOUNG WOMEN IS ON THE RISE

-Melissa, diagnosed 2010

BREAST CANCER IN YOUNG WOMEN IS ON THE RISE

-Melissa, diagnosed 2010
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Melissa was flying high and loving life. Working as a long-haul flight attendant, Melissa's life was full of fun, friends and adventure. As a young woman, she didn't think that it was possible to be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Having spent two years living overseas, Melissa decided it was time to come back home to Australia so that she could be closer to her family.

She hadn't been back for long when one night, she felt a sharp pain and noticed a lump in her breast. She went straight to the doctor and was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma - the most common form of breast cancer.

BREAST CANCER AFFECTS YOUNG AND OLD

 

Melissa started her treatment quickly and after two operations, as well as chemotherapy, her future was looking bright again. That was until she had to pay another visit to the doctor - this time with her mother as the patient. And she too was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Watch Melissa and Gabrielle's incredible story and remember that breast cancer doesn't discriminate.

HOW TO CHECK YOUR BREASTS

Thanks to research, early detection rates are improving for breast cancer.
One way women can be proactive is by checking their own breasts regularly.
By detecting cancer early, chances of survival are greatly improved.

We encourage all women, young and old, to do their own breast self-checks.
To help you we've developed the NBCF Breast Self-Check Guide. It provides simple advice and step-by-step instructions on how to check correctly.

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WHAT'S IN THE BREAST SELF-EXAM GUIDE?

Our Breast Self-Exam Guide will show you:

1



What you should be looking for

2



Where to check on your body

3



The four steps you should be following every month.

Download your Breast Self-Exam Guide now

It's important to be aware that finding a lump doesn't mean that you have cancer. Most lumps are harmless. So, don't panic, but do make an appointment with your doctor for further evaluation.